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5 Reasons You Should Adopt a German Shepherd

When looking to adopt a dog, you’ll likely spend time researching breeds and finding personality traits and physical traits that appeal to you and your lifestyle and taste. And while we’re all for just heading to your local shelter or rescue and seeing who you connect with, we also totally support getting to know your breeds before you make any final decisions. While many adoptable pups are mixed breed, they usually have one distinguishing breed within them and most shelters and rescues are also full of pure breeds as well. You’ll want to consider obvious things like activity level, trainability, health concerns and size. To help, we like to spotlight different breeds so that you can learn a bit more why you should considering adopting one. This week, we’re talking about one of the most popular dogs in the US (and thus, often found in shelters across the states), German Shepherds!

German Shepherds, best known today for their noble service as police dogs, trace their popularity as house pets to their shining history as celebrities. After careful breeding in Germany in the late 19th century, the pups found stardom: They frequently appeared on the big screen, bringing furry fun to silent films as early as 1922. In fact, they’re still one of the top three most popular breeds to appear on film and tv.

5 reasons to consider adopting a GSD:

  1. They’re smart. It’s no wonder GSD’s are the choice service dog for the police, as they are an extremely intelligent and quick learning breed. Training them will be easier and more rewarding than with many other breeds. Schutzhund, a German word for “protection dog,” is a sporting event that tests talents, such as tracking, obedience and protection. Originally created to test German shepherds, your pup is bound to outperform their friends at the dog park. They also love to please their owners, making them less likely to engage in negative behaviors.
  2. They’re perfect for active families. GSD’s make the perfect running and hiking partners, as they love exercise and are strong and adventurous.
  3. They’re healthy. With the proper diet and enough exercise, German Shepherds have few major health risks. The main risks are canine hip dysplasia (CHD) and elbow dysplasia, both of which are preventable. They generally live around 12 years, so you know you’ll plenty of time with them too.
  4. They’re highly adaptable. Though German Shepherds prefer larger yards, they easily adapt to apartment living as long as they get enough exercise each day (at least a 30 minute brisk walk). Plus, with proper socialization, a German Shepherd will make a great playmate for children and will exhibit extreme loyalty to the family. Though German Shepherds are often aloof toward new people, they follow your lead and are likely to warm up to the people you love.
  5. They’re heroes in dog form. Often recognized for heroic acts, German Shepherds relentlessly serve their special humans. In fact, Filax of Lewanno, a canine soldier, was honored in 1917 for bringing 54 wounded soldiers to safety during World War I.

Need some other quick reasons? They don’t shed badly (only seasonally and nothing crazy), they love water (beach day, anyone?), they don’t need to be bathed much and they come in a wide range of color combos, making each pup a little unique. And have you seen how cute they are as puppies!? If you’re considering adopting a GSD, you’ll want to check out this handy guide on things to look for as you meet GSD’s.

Not quite sold yet? Check out the amazing German Shepherds that are available for adoption from German Shepherd Rescue – Burbank and see if you can resist their charms any longer.

In the comments below tell us why you’re thinking about adopting a GSD. Or maybe you already have one or two? Help others with tips on what to expect and why they should definitely consider having a German Shepherd in their life!

Benefits of Adopting a Specially-abled Dog

Benefits of Adopting a Specially-abled Dog

 

Did you know: May 3rd is National Specially-abled Pets Day (formerly Disabled Pets Day)? Now here’s a holiday we can get behind! Specially-abled Pets Day celebrates these amazing and heroic animals, helps to educate the public about caring for disabled pets and finds homes for orphaned, specially-abled pets. Founded in 2006 and internationally embraced, the decision was made to change the original name when founder Colleen Paige felt that it just didn’t fit. “The name held too negative a connotation… because these pets are very able! Pets that become challenged due to disease, birth flaws or injuries, tend to develop greater senses than your average pet. Most of the time it’s as if they never had to readjust to life… and we need to keep up with them!” Celebrated on May 3rd annually, National Specially-abled Pets Day encourages adoption always and hopes that people who would like to bring a new furry family member home will consider a specially-abled pet.

 

A PetFinder poll found special needs pets are the third-hardest animals to place, behind senior pets and bully breeds. Many of these “less adoptable” pets spend up to two years waiting for a forever home, more than four times the average wait. This is just part of why we always condone adoption over buying here at Dog for Dog, and today we’d like to talk about the advantages and key points of adopting a specially-abled dog. This is, of course, beyond the very obvious point that choosing to adopt a dog with special needs in many cases means saving the life of that dog or at the very least (if they’re coming from rescue), means that you’re taking on an amazing task that few would even consider facing. Special needs can encompass various disabilities, chronic medical conditions and behavioral issues. Some common problems among cats and dogs include missing one or more limbs, hind limb paralysis, deafness and or blindness, diabetes, allergies, urinary tract infections and lack of socialization. Some pets might require diapers, ramps, support slings, regular medication, and dog training and/or pet socialization classes.

 

One set of limited skills can bring out a whole new set of advantages. Pamela Nakamura wasn’t necessarily looking to adopt a special needs pet when she came across a beautiful yellow Lab named Max two years ago. “I knew from his photo that he was missing an eye,” says Pamela. “I didn’t want him to get passed by and I really wanted to give him a good home.” While Max is a little clumsier than your average dog (he has a tendency to bump into fences and walls) he has surprising mouth-eye coordination that makes him excellent at playing fetch, says Pamela. Learning to walk him was a little awkward in the beginning. However, she quickly learned if she keeps him on her right side that she’s within his eyesight and he feels safe and content. Overall, the past two years with Max has been really positive and Pamela says she wouldn’t hesitate adopting a special needs pet again.

 

Consider the commitment. Rochelle Michalek, the executive director of Paws Chicago, a no-kill shelter that rescues and adopts out injured and healthy pets in the Windy City, says that “Animals with disabilities are incredibly adaptable and despite their injuries can still be functional and even find a way to play. We put animals in homes where there is a commitment to succeed. People who adopt disabled pets ought to be of the proactive set. The environment at home has got to meet the needs of the pet and owners have to be committed to providing exercise, stimulation and training when necessary. Paw’s philosophy is one of education. We really talk about the cost of medical care so people in tricky financial situations know what they are taking on.” Her rescue also offers foster-to-adopt setups, where potential adopters can take their new bud home for a few weeks to make sure the new situation is one that works for both the pup and their human counterpart.

Stay open minded. In “The Power of Three Legs,” co-founder of Best Friends Animal Society Faith Maloney says that nowadays disabled animals are often the first to be adopted at the shelter. “It wasn’t long ago that any animal coming into a shelter with a defect – be it three legs or one eye – was considered unadoptable and automatically destroyed,” says Maloney. “But just as there are trends for certain breeds of pets, the trend now in adoptions is toward animals that come with publicity attached or with readily apparent war wounds.” This isn’t necessary a good thing – with the rise of so many “animal celebrities,” shelters are often overwhelmed with adoption requests for a few pets at the expense of many others. While this publicity can be a boon for the pet in question, there’s only one available for adoption; many potential adopters will leave empty-handed without considering other animals.

Blindness in a pet doesn’t mean you’ll have to hawkeye them 24/7. Actually, blind cats and dogs are no different than other animals! A blind pet doesn’t know what blindness is or that he or she has it, so they act like a regular dog or cat. “Blind cats can do pretty much everything that a seeing cat can do,” says Blind Cat Rescue, a permanent housing sanctuary in North Carolina. “They can climb trees, climb up on top of cabinets and get into places that you cannot figure out how they did it.” When caring for a blind pet, it’s important to maintain a consistent household. This means keeping food and water bowls, litter boxes and furniture in the same spots; blind pets navigate using their other senses, so moving things can confuse them. Dog trainer Cesar Millan recommends blocking off dangerous areas like stairs or pools with a baby gate, and laying down carpet runners or creating a “sniff path” of air fresheners on your pet’s regular route.

Deaf dogs are still totally trainable. Many animal shelters initially can’t tell if a pet is deaf; they look and act just like a regular pup – because they are. While many deaf dogs are easily started even by the lightest touch, with regular training they can be desensitized. “Deaf dog owners do take special measures to alert the dog to their presence before walking up to, or touching the dog,” says the Deaf Dog Education and Action Fund. A vibrating or “vibe” collar is used to train deaf dogs in a way similar to clicker training. Because dogs rely more on visual cues and body language than spoken words – they don’t understand English, after all – training a deaf dog is no more difficult than with a regular pup. One pet parent even made news for teaching her deaf Great Dane American Sign Language and many trainers teach their hearing dogs ASL commands as well.

Tripawds have an extra zest for life, in case you didn’t already know! While it’s true an animal amputee won’t be winning any races, the majority of dogs and cats get along just fine on three legs. Many report their three-legged pets are particularly spunky. Tripawds, a community for pet parents of three-legged animals, encourages strengthening your dog’s abdominal core muscles to compensate for missing limbs, rather than excessive walks or runs. Many tripawd dogs wear a special harness that allows for easy maneuvering of stairs and cars, while others can provide extra support. The location of the missing limb can make initial recovery difficult for some pets. “The front leg accounts for approximately 70 percent of the dog’s strength and balance,” says Seattle pet hydrotherapist Sheila Wells. “That is why front-leg amputees often have a more difficult time adjusting to their new state. The rear can follow but the front has to lead.” In any case, there’s no need for a long face when you spot a three-legged doggie!

Inspired and obsessed yet? Check out these six heroic special needs animals and check out the official website of NSAPD for a list of blogs all about special needs animals. In the comments below, tell us about your special needs pet or a favorite one you’ve met!

Here’s a video of our friend @underbiteunite on Instagram

“All too often I think Specially-abled Pets are overlooked because people are worried it will cost too much money to care for them or that it’ll just take too much work. That is not the case. Most animals, especially those that are blind in one eye or missing a leg, do just as well as if they had no issues at all. Dogs in wheelchairs can run around chasing balls, playing with other dogs and romping through water. Even totally blind animals can chase toys by sniffing them out. Animals are so resilient. They just need a chance to show us what courageous little heroes they are!” – Colleen Paige

Go Green with your Dog for Earth Day

by DOG for DOG Team 0 Comments

Going Green with your (1)

It may be a tiny holiday in the grand scheme of a packed year of days to celebrate, but April 22nd is Earth Day, something we can all get behind – no matter where we reside on planet earth. The internet will quickly fill with genius and helpful ways to go eco-friendly in your day to day life in a variety of ways and means, but we wanted to focus on one particular part of your life that could likely use a little eco-magic – that’s right, dog lovers. It’s time to reduce your carbon paw-print. We’ve rounded up some simple and tried-and-true methods for greenifying your life as pet parent, and while none of us can expect perfection or overnight change, taking a few small steps in the right direction can have a huge effect in the overall. We hope you’ll consider giving some of these tricks a go!

 

  1. Reduce or replace your paper towel use. Most of us are guilty of using copious amounts of paper towels in our day to day life, and especially grab them for help cleaning up after our pets. But those rolls of paper, however endlessly useful, are no bueno for the environment. Consider using regular towels or rags instead of paper towels to clean up after your pet. If you just can’t break the paper towel cycle, consider using reusable personal hand towels that are machine-washable.
  2. Ditch the dumpster. Many items that your pet no longer uses or has grown out of might still be able to be put to use at a shelter. Call your local shelter to see if they need any of the items (old beds, blankets, towels, collars, etc.), or organize a swap with friends and neighbors.
  3. Choose poop bags wisely. Instead of using plastic bags to pick up after your dog or clean the litter box, use biodegradable bags. They typically break down in about 1 month as opposed to an estimated 1,500 years for a plastic bag in a landfill. Cat litter is also available in all-natural and biodegradable forms, and you can even consider making your own pet waste compost container.
  4. Ditch the extra paper. If you are still mailing checks to your favorite animal charity, switch to online or telephone donations or automatic direct debiting from a bank account (and go paperless on statements).
  5. Check the labels. Do your existing products use eco-friendly materials and packaging? Check the labels to see what is inside the product and if the bottle or container is recyclable or made of biodegradable materials. Stuck with plastic? Recycle after use. Purchasing eco-friendly pet products is a simple change, but it can really help lower the environmental impact of your pets. Dog owners, for example, can find many different varieties of shampoo on the market that use natural or sustainably-sourced ingredients. For cat owners, kitty litter can be an environmental concern as it often does not biodegrade. Thankfully there are litter products available made from biodegradable or recycled materials. You can also reduce the chemicals in your home by making your own cleaners and deodorizers. Instead of spraying over a pet smell, you might already have everything you need right in your pantry.
  6. No more plastic bottles, evvvvvver! This is one of the most simple and important moves we humans can make. If you use plastic bottles for your pet’s water or for taking water with you when you go out, install a filter on your tap and use a permanent, washable bottle instead of plastic.
  7. Bring reusable bags to your local pet store. We all remember to do it at the grocery store, but those same reusable totes will work well on your next trip to the vet or pet store. When heading out with your pet, grab one to to carry things back home with you.
  8. Make your own food and treats, when possible. Many animals can live on perfectly healthy diets with meals made at home. Consult your veterinarian for advice. Homemade treats are another way to use ingredients you already have while saving a trip to the store and reducing packaging waste. Otherwise, yet another way to decrease the environmental impact of our pets is to choose pet food from companies with a commitment to the planet. At TerraCycle, they have partnered with pet food brands Open Farm and Wellness TruFood to open free recycling programs for pet food bag waste, allowing anyone to send in their pet food bags for recycling. Family pets are able to have their favorite sustainably produced food, while packaging waste is diverted from the landfill.
  9. Think about storage. Use a washable and reusable container to store food and treats instead of a plastic bag.
  10. Ditch the paper plates. If you feed your pet food, treats or scraps by placing a paper plate on the floor, switch to a plate you can wash to reduce the paper waste. Designate or buy a plate that everyone knows is for the pet. Wash it separately by hand before storing it away from regular dishes.
  11. Reduce driving. Do you drive to a dog park just to walk around? Look for closer parks or nature trails, or arrange walks or play dates with friends and neighbors with their pets.
  12. Wanna get really wild? Compost! Pet waste can be a particularly hazardous pollutant – especially to nearby water sources– and dogs alone are responsible for 10 million tons of it every year. But believe it or not, your pet’s waste can be used as an effective ingredient for compost. There are plenty of tutorials online to help start a compost pile with pet waste. Keep in mind that dog waste compost is not recommended for plants and crops meant for human consumption.
  13. Choose your toys wisely. Playtime can also be eco-friendly with the right products. For the cat owners, this list of eco-friendly toys boasts a wide range of fun things to keep your cat occupied. You will find everything from dye-free toys made with organic materials, to toys created with recycled or upcycled materials. To ensure old toys don’t end up in the trash, be sure to donate or upcycle them instead. You can always make your own toys as well! Cats love balls of aluminum foil, hair ties, and paper towel rolls, while dogs will always be happy with an old ball from the garage.
  14. Spay and neuter your pets. The exact number of strays in the United States may never be pinpointed, but the ASPCA estimates that there are over 70 million stray cats alone. Spaying or neutering your pets is one of the easiest and most effective ways to prevent further overpopulation. When strays – especially cats – multiply, they can severely disrupt the surrounding ecosystem. Feral cats are even listed on the Invasive Species Specialist Group’s list of worst invasive species on earth, and it is believed that they are responsible for over one billion animal deaths each year.
  15. Lastly – and most importantly – adopt don’t shop. Please, please, adopt a pet from a shelter or rescue instead of buying. This has a cascading effect: Puppy mills will have reduced demand, fewer animals will be bred for profit, and much-needed available space will open up in shelters — where literally millions of pets are being euthanized each year in the U.S. simply because there isn’t enough room for them all.

 

Want even more tips? Check out a few other stories here, here, and here.

 

So, earth loving dog parents, what would you add to our list? And what measures have you already been taking in your day to day pet life to keep things kosher with the planet? We’d love to hear more of your tips and findings in the comments below!

 

 

5 Tax Breaks Your Dog is Giving You

by DOG for DOG Team 0 Comments

5 tax breaks your dog is giving you this yearDog lovers, it’s April – and you know what that means. Yes, showers for those May flowers but also… taxes. Now just breathe. We know taxes are a big, scary, ugly word for many of us, but there is at least one bright spot this year if you fostered a dog in the last year or were otherwise involved in the dog rescue world. Eligible deductions! Funny to think about, but fostering a dog actually does come with benefits for your tax purposes, and being in-the-know about what exactly you can do to get those write offs is a bonus this time of year. While you can’t claim your pups as dependents (no matter how much money and stress they may cause), there are other ways to get them in on your paperwork.

In 2009, a Michigan senator introduced a bill that would give pet owners up to $3,500 a year in tax refunds for “qualified pet care” costs. It was an ambitious, heavily inclusive piece of lawmaking that would’ve saved pet owners a chunk of money; unfortunately, the HAPPY Act (short for Humanity and Pets Partnered Through the Years) didn’t pass on Capitol Hill, despite a decent showing of public support. In spite of the HAPPY Act’s demise, there are some examples of tax-deductible pet care for our four-legged friends. We’ve outlined the biggies below:

Fostering: Maybe you and your family want to open up your hearts and become a foster pet parent. If you work with a qualified 501(c)(3) organization, you may be able to deduct your expenses as a charitable contribution. That means that your veterinarian visits, pet supplies, food, and other related expenses could qualify. Don’t forget to keep track of your mileage (provided the trip is for the organization). As always, make sure you keep careful records and receipts of your expenses. If your expenses are over $250, request an acknowledgement from the charitable organization. If you use TurboTax, TurboTax ItsDeductible will value and track your donations so you have them all together when it comes time to file your taxes. As a result of Van Dusen v. Commissioner, animal rescuers nationwide that are fostering dogs and/or cats for approved charities may claim the expenses during tax time. Even a portion of your utilities can be considered expenses as long as a specific area of your home is only used for the care of the animals and nothing else.

Service Animals: Another situation where you may be able to deduct expenses is if your furry friend is a service animal. You must register your pet with a legitimate agency to prove that it is a service animal and not just a pet. Additionally, if you have a guard dog to protect your business you may be able to claim some of the costs as a business expense. You can deduct expenses such as training and veterinarian care, but like service dogs, you need an agency to declare the four legged protector a guard dog.

Moved? According to Kiplinger, If you moved during the tax year, it might be possible to deduct your moving expenses – including those specifically related to moving your dog. For example, if moving your dog requires special expenses, those expenses are treated no differently (in the federal government’s eyes) than any of your personal effects. Making special arrangements to get Fido from your old home to your new one? Save the receipts!

Rescue and Shelter Donations: It would be easy to assume that the costs of adopting a dog from a registered non-profit, 501(c), would be deductible – the assumption would be wrong. The cost to adopt a dog is not deductible. However, any donations made in excess of regular adoption fees most certainly are. According to the law, only those donations made where no goods or services are received in exchange (i.e., your new dog) can be deducted. Should you choose to make donations to your favorite 501c dog charity, make sure to ask for a letter of receipt that states no goods or services were received. Donations of both goods and services to an approved charity are tax deductible. When donating goods or services to an approved charity, ask for a donation receipt – you’ll need it if the value of your donations exceeds $250. To deduct a charitable contribution, you must file Form 1040 and itemize deductions on Schedule A. It may seem small, but every little bit helps! Local animal shelters need your newspaper, old towels, sheets, pet beds, sweaters, crates and blankets. They may also be looking for items such as digital cameras, video recorders, printers, fans, heaters, cleaning supplies, office equipment, printer paper, carpeting, and furniture. You can also purchase and donate new items including food, toys, new litter boxes, dog beds, and cat trees. Even if your donation isn’t useful to the shelter itself, they might be able to use it to raise funds. The value of items donated can be a tax deduction! Again, assuming they are a qualified organization, you can deduct the fair market value of the property at the time of the contribution, so keep track of what you give and when, and be sure to save the receipts of those newly purchased items. Any cash donation you make to a qualified charitable organization is tax deductible for those who itemize deductions. Don’t know if your favorite rescue fits the bill? Check out IRS Publication 78 for more information on qualifying organizations. While you typically cannot deduct the value of your time, you can deduct mileage traveling to and from the shelter or rescue. The IRS allows a deduction of 14 cents per mile driven in service of a charitable organization. Keep a notebook in your car to track mileage, or use an iPhone or Android app such as Mileage Pad.

Walkers and Trainers: If you own and operate a business with dogs, of course your dog-related business expenses are deductible. If you’re a trainer, you may be able to deduct mileage or transportation costs for visiting clients and their dogs. If you’re a dog walker and need to purchase business related items like leashes and poop bags, those expenses can be itemized. As with any job-related expense, just make sure to keep all receipts and be able to prove the items were for job duties, not for your personal pet.  

Fellow dog lovers, what advice do you have for fellow dog owners on what expenses to claim on their taxes? Do you know any key ones we’re missing? Be sure to share and lets tough out this tax season together!

14 Ways your Dog says I Love You

by DOG for DOG Team 0 Comments

Valentine’s Day is a day of romance and chocolate and (best of all), love. While celebrations on Valentine’s Day are usually limited to couples, there’s no reason why everyone can’t get in on the action, and that includes your pup(s)! We know you love them to the moon and back, and they feel exactly the same way about you. And they don’t just show it once a year! Dogs show you their love in a hundred tiny ways, some of which you may not always notice. You can show them affection back by spending extra time on a walk or at the park, playing with a ball in the backyard or baking up some fun V-day themed dog treats. As our treat to you for the holiday, we thought it would be fun to round up 14 ways your pup says I love you to you throughout the year.

  1. Looking into your eyes. On a 60 Minutes segment, Anderson Cooper met with Brian Hare, a well-known dog expert, to discuss how dogs express love. According to Hare, when your dog looks you in the eye, he is “hugging you with his eyes.” Aww!
  2.  Yawning when you yawn. We know that yawns are contagious between humans, but did you know that dogs can also pick up this behavior? A study found that when humans echo another’s yawn, it’s because they’re empathetic, like sympathy pains. It’s impossible to measure if dogs are empathetic, but it’s possible that a dog yawning at the same time as a human happens because the dog has bonded with that person. The study also found that dogs were more likely to yawn when their owners yawned, as opposed to a stranger.
  3. Leaning on you. We’ve all met dogs who do this and it’s easy to read as a sign of affection. Sometimes a dog will lean on a human because he is anxious, wants you to do something or take him somewhere. But leaning is also a symbol of affection. Enjoy it!
  4. Cuddling with you after a meal. In his book, How Dogs Love Us, Gregory Berns says that if your dog cuddles with your after eating, it’s a strong sign of affection. Most dogs lovers know that pups are motivated by food. But according to Berns, once a dog eats all of its food, his next action can signify what’s most important to him besides eating.
  5. Lifting and wiggling their eyebrows. In a recent study in Japan, dogs were introduced to their parent, a stranger, a dog toy, and an item they didn’t like. When seeing their parent, the dogs immediately lifted their eyebrows (especially their left), and when they saw a stranger there was a lot less facial movement, except for movement of the right brow. Yet, when they saw an item they knew and had bonded with, the dogs shifted their left ear back. But if it was an item they didn’t like, their right ear shifted. According to the study, this suggests the dog is more reserved when they are engaging someone they don’t know or something they disapprove of.
  6. When they calmly watch you leave the house. It’s easy to think that if a dog panics when you leave that it’s a sign that they love you. That’s not necessarily true, according to Gregory Berns. If your dog panics when you leave, it’s more of a sign that they have separation anxiety than that they love you. If a dog goes into his crate or is accepting of you leaving, i.e. they’re calm when you leave, it means your dog loves and trusts you and is confident that you will return.
  7. Freaking out when you return. A bit of the opposite is true here!.The instinctive feeling here that they’re showing true happiness and love when they’re excited that you’e home is correct – this is love in it’s truest form!
  8. Wanting to sleep in your room. Whether or not you allow it, your dog wanting to be near you during the night is a sign of affection. According to Berns, if a dog wants to sleep on your bed, it’s a good test of his loyalty because he doesn’t want to be separated from the pack.
  9. Bringing your his/her favorite toy. If your pup brings you his favorite, most coveted toy, it doesn’t just mean your dog wants to play. Although wanting to play with you is a sign of affection in itself, when your dog brings you his favorite ball, it may also mean he thinks of you as his pack leader. Because of this, he wants to please you by offering you his finest possession, be it a squeaky toy or well-worn Frisbee. Pretty sweet, huh?
  10. Wagging their tail. We often think of a dog’s wagging tail as a sign of happiness, but that’s only part of the truth. Dogs use it to communicate many different emotions, including happiness, fear, tension or even an imminent attack. Generally, the looser and more relaxed your dog’s tail is, the more relaxed they are. When your dog is happy, its tail will sweep back and forth in a friendly way, or even in circles.
  11. Shadowing your when you’re sick. Because dogs are inherently social animals, they possess an instinct to care for their “pack.” In the wild, wolves often lick each other’s wounds and care for each other in times of duress, and dogs retain this instinct. Yes, they may lick your actual wound, but their need to care for you can also extend to simply recognizing when you’re feeling sick, and watching over you.
  12. Following you around. As the key alpha in your pet’s life, your dog knows that you provide it’s food, shelter, safety and affection. The animal’s best chances of survival is to stick with you, it’s pack leader. Also, dogs are social creatures that want to be part of a community, of which you are the main member.
  13. Jumping on you. While this is a typically undesirable behavior, dogs jump on people because they like them. When you come home after work or from running some errands, your dog is excited and wants to rejoice at your return! While you may find it better to teach your dog another, more acceptable way to share their excitement, jumping should generally be seen as a display of affection.
  14. Playing with you. While it seems to come at the most inopportune times, our dogs sometimes get playful and try to wrestle with us. This is their natural way of playing! If you’ve ever watched your pup play with another dog, you’ll recognize he’s offering the same behavior to you. Doing a little wrestling with your pooch is certainly safe and fun, and will even give you a new game to play to keep your relationship strong!

Happy Valentine’s Day to all of our favorite dogs out there! In the comments below, share with us how your dog shows you their love!

5 Tips For Your Dalmatian’s Health & Happiness

by DOG for DOG Team 0 Comments

So you’ve watched 101 Dalmatians as a kid and it’s always been your dream to adopt one. As you’re likely already aware, Dalmatians – like every dog breed – are unique in their personalities and needs. You’ll want to take the time to familiarize yourself with the specific health needs of their breed. While every dog is different even within the same breed, there are general need-to-knows for each breed of dog. To help you along your journey, we’ve rounded up five top care tips for both new or potential Dalmatian owners.

Exercise is key. While all dogs need a bit of exercise, the amount needed varies based on breed, size and age. Like many breeds, Dalmatians love exercise. Not only does it do their body good but it calms and relaxes their minds. An hour or two a day of running in a dog park, going for a hike or playing fetch in the yard will help relieve some of the tension and stress that builds up from loneliness and boredom. A puppy will need less playtime, as they’re still growing and tucker out easier. Since their energy comes in short bursts, consider playing several short games throughout the day to keep them entertained. Having a calm, relaxed pup around the house is better for everyone!

Consider a low-purine diet. Dalmatians are prone to bladder stones, which can be limited with a specific diet. Stones and crystals can form anywhere in the urinary tract of the dog, from the kidney to the urethra to the most common location – the bladder. The stones can cause mild irritation, or can partially or even completely block the flow of urine in major cases, making urination painful or in some cases life-threateningly impossible. The end result is the need for a specialized diet for Dalmatians that is low in purines – but not necessarily low in protein. A low-purine, high-quality diet can be beneficial both in the prevention and treatment of urinary tract health issues. While Dalmatians uniquely metabolize purine-yielding foods, they certainly do not hold exclusive domain over urinary tract infections and stone-related problems. An ideal diet for Dalmatians is one that’s low in purines (components of certain foods – primarily found in animal proteins – that metabolize into uric acid in the body), moderate in high-quality proteins (and devoid of substandard protein sources), high in complex carbohydrates (whole grains, fruits, and low-purine vegetables help rid the body of extra uric acid), low in fat (fat holds onto uric acid in the kidneys), low in unnecessary fillers (foods that add little in the way of nutrients and for the most part simply result in larger stools for your dog), and low in salt. Nutritional supplements such as potassium citrates (for preventing calcium oxalate crystals) and sodium bicarbonate (for preventing cystine crystals) may also be encouraged for dogs with histories of or genetically predisposed to kidney and/or urinary stone problems. Don’t forget to give the treats you feed your Dalmatian the same attention and scrutiny as his or her diet. Many treats contain an unhealthy combination of high purines in the form of substandard meat byproducts or yeast content, as well as chemical preservatives, added salt, and unnecessary fillers.

Keep fresh water abounding. Urinary stones form more easily in concentrated, acidic urine, so while a healthy dog food diet that helps promote an alkaline urine is step one, rule number two is helping to keep your dog’s urine neutral and as dilute as possible by ensuring your Dalmatian has access to and drinks plenty of fresh water each day. This means keeping fresh water in a variety of locations throughout your house and backyard, and ensuring your dog has easy access to each of the water bowls. If your Dalmatian needs a little extra incentive to drink, a helpful tip is to add 3/4 to 1 cup or so of extra water to your Dalmatian’s dry food meals. Adding the water right before setting the food out will help keep your Dalmatian well hydrated while ensuring s/he still receives the teeth-cleaning and gum-exercising benefits provided by the kibble. You can also increase your Dalmatian’s water consumption by feeding a canned dog food diet with a high water content, although you’ll lose some of the teeth-cleaning benefits provided by a dry kibble dog food and will generally end up spending needlessly on the predominantly water-based content in the can.

Sweater up! Dalmatians have a short coat so they can become cold if spending time outside during the winter (we’re talking about you Storm Jonas). Be sure to have a sweater for those colder winter strolls! While their fur coats are light, Dalmatians do still shed quite a bit, especially in the spring and fall. Daily brushing during these times will help you keep excess hair off your floor.

Dalmatians and kiddos. No dog breed was more highly sought after in the late nineties than Dalmatians, stars of the hugely popular kids film 101 Dalmatians. The irony, of course, is that while Dalmatians are gorgeous and loving dogs (and there are certainly exceptions to every rule), they are not known for being particularly great with young children. Known to act reserved or even skittish around strangers, Dalmatians, as a whole, are generally happier in older families or households without children. They are nice by nature, but sometimes spook with surprise attacks and can be too hyper to compete with children in the house for the adults’ attention! However, they do very well with other pets, including horses; so they will thrive in households where they can form bonds with fellow animals. If you’ve got young kids and would love to make it work, be sure to check out our stories on keeping dogs and kids in harmony, and work with your Dalmatian to ensure they’re getting the proper exercise and training to function well within your family.

And there you have it! Five tips for helping your new (or potential!) furry friend live a comfortable and happy existence in your home and wherever your adventures take you. Have some tips of your own to share with fellow Dalmatian owners? Dispense them in the comments below, and together we can establish the perfect Dalmatian-guide-to-life!

Training Isn’t Enough: How to Bond With Your Dog

by Kristen Duvall 4 Comments

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People laugh at how my Great Dane, Annabelle, will sit on my lap at the vet’s office. Or how at the dog park, when she’s nervous, she leans on me and plays next to me. But these same people aren’t laughing when it’s time to leave the dog park, and Annabelle walks right along beside me, ready to go home without a fight. They’re also not laughing when my boyfriend and I were so absent-minded one day, we forgot to put on her leash and let her out the door. We made it all the way to the front gate of our apartment complex before we realized, she wasn’t leashed. Why? Because unlike many dogs who would use this as an opportunity to run free and wild, Annabelle stayed by our side, walking down the steps, as if she was on a leash the whole time.

You might say we have trained our dog well, and yes, we have. Annabelle is a very well-behaved dog. But she wasn’t always that way. When I got her as a puppy, she was defiant and somewhat troublesome. She was certainly a handful, to say the least. More so than most, it seemed. She would often slip out of her collar, forcing me to chase her around parking lots – in what was often a vain attempt – to catch her. My mom once told me that she was the most difficult dog she’d ever met, and most people told me I should consider rehoming her.

But I didn’t. And through the years, Annabelle and I bonded. I don’t formally train her as well as often as I should, but part of the reason for that is because I don’t have to. Annabelle trusts me. We can now go to the dog beach, which isn’t fenced in, and let her run free, knowing she isn’t going to run off. If she gets too far, I merely call out her name and she rebounds back to me without a moment’s hesitation. Though even that is rare, as she always keeps an eye on us and makes sure to stay close by. She has no desire to leave her humans and run off. She loves us.

But it’s more than just love. She also trusts me.

I say me and not us because while she adores my boyfriend, he wasn’t here from the beginning. He came into her life after she was a year old, and moved in with us when she was four. He’s had less time to bond with her. Where I was at home with her during her formative years, all day, every day. He wasn’t.

She gets super excited when he comes home from work, to the point that she’s almost unmanageable. She loves him so much. But when it comes time for a command, she always looks to her mama. Or when she’s scared, like when we had an earthquake about a year ago, she ran to me and sat on my lap.

And this is important for a number of reasons. When Annabelle got deathly ill and lost part of her foot to a freak flesh-eating bacterial infection, I had to soak her paw in medicine for half an hour, twice a day, and then wrap it. She let me. When it comes time to put medicine in her ears – something she hates with every fiber of her being – she lets me. Warily, sure, but she lets me. She knows mama knows best and would never do anything to harm her. It makes life so much easier to have my dog trust me unconditionally because she’s so bonded to me.

Many people know that training your dog is important as it makes everyone’s life a little easier. And there’s no doubt that we all love our canine companions and yes, they love us too.

But if you’re frequently frustrated with your dog or think they’re too “stupid” to learn basic commands, perhaps there’s another issue in play here – something that training nor love can fix. Perhaps you need to strengthen the human and dog bond.

I can hear it now! You love your dog so much! Of course you do, we aren’t questioning that. But people often mistake their love of their dog for a bond. It’s not exactly the same thing. Love is something that occurs naturally, it’s what makes your dog happy to see you when you come home, and what makes you happy to see them. You can love without bonding, though. Think about it. You might love a relative, say a distant aunt or an in-law, but it’s not the same feeling you have with your significant other or your best friend. And part of the reason is that you love them, but you’re not bonded with them.

And the same can go for your dog. Loving them makes them happy to see you, but bonding with them makes them stay by your side when the urge to run out the door is strong. It goes deeper than obedience training to make your dog come when called, it takes trust. It takes bonding.

The human dog bond doesn’t have to be complicated. In fact, it’s usually a natural process that occurs when you own a dog and go through all the steps in raising them. Initially, your puppy may not look to you for guidance, but as you build up that trust, you will find training gets easier and easier.

How can you tell if your dog is bonded with you? Look to your day to day life and activities.

* When you’re out walking, do they pull on the leash and walk ahead of you? Or do they match your pace? Do they look up at you from time to time as if they’re checking to see if you’re still there? A bonded dog will check in with their owners as they’re out and about on their walks.

* At the dog park, yes, your dog will likely run off to play with other dogs. As they should! But does you dog look for you from time to time, perhaps even coming back to you just to check in? If so, that’s a sign of a bonded dog who doesn’t want to lose sight of their owner.

* When they’re faced with something scary, say the vet or a thunderstorm, do they look at you? Maybe they’ll sit in your lap or hide under your feet? This is a sign that they trust you to protect them. Even if they do run and hide elsewhere, they will probably keep an eye on you, watching you for signs of danger because they know as long as their human is calm, everything will be okay. That’s a sign of a strong human-dog bond.

If this doesn’t sound like your dog, there’s no reason to fret. Different breeds bond differently, and some take more time than others. And this is one of those things you can continually work on. Bonding with your dog won’t happen overnight. It took about a year to get where I am with Annabelle, and now, everywhere we go, people comment on how well-behaved she is.

It’s because she trusts me. And you can work on this trust with your dog as well.

First and foremost, you need to look at the training you provide your dog. Research has proven time and time again that positive reinforcement works better than punishment and alpha dog training. A happy, trusting animal will listen better than one who’s scared of punishment. Sure, if you punish or use alpha dog training, you may get the dog to do what you want, but ultimately, they’re doing it from a place of fear, not trust. And in the long term, it’s less effective. And many dogs will merely act out when you’re not around to punish them, which defeats the whole purpose of this anyway.

Harsh punishments such as spanking, yelling or an alpha roll are not going to help your dog bond with you. Instead, offering direction, praise and treats will make them eager and happy to please you. Over time, as they see that you are looking out for their best interests, they will learn to trust you more. And the more they trust you, the more likely they will look to you for guidance.

How to bond with your dog:

* Playing with them. Have fun, let loose and let them be a dog. Toss a ball around the yard or play tug of war. Learn their favorite games, buy some of their favorite types of toys, and just play. Not only will it help strengthen your bond, it will relax you and allow you to truly enjoy what it means to have a dog in your life. It’s not all hard work and frustration after all!

* Training. Yes, a well-bonded dog will be easier to train, but it goes the other way as well. Training your dog will help you bond with them. Not only is a trained dog allowed more personal freedom, but they mere act of training them – in a positive fashion – will bring you closer together.

* Remain calm. Yes, owning a dog – especially a puppy – comes with frustrations and anxiousness. And sometimes it’s not even about your dog, but life in general. But yelling, screaming and throwing a temper tantrum will frighten most dogs, even if that anger isn’t directed at them personally. And if it is, then it’s even more damaging. Do your best to always speak to your dog in a calm voice, even when they just ate your favorite shoes. Yelling doesn’t do anything to fix the problem, it only causes lasting damage to the relationship you have with your dog.

AnnabelleKristenKiss* Pay attention to their body language. Learn about canine behavior and read up on body language specifically. This will help you understand what your dog likes, dislikes and what scares them. This will allow you to prevent problems before they start, and to remove your dog from situations that scare them or make them uncomfortable. Once they learn that you will keep them safe, the trust between you will grow. Also, this will allow you to prevent bad behavior before it happens, meaning less frustration and less punishment, both of which can hurt the bond with your dog.

The bottom line is this: Owning a dog should bring joy to your life. It should also provide the dog with what they need to be happy and content. By creating happy moments and by caring for your dog, there’s really no way you won’t bond over time. Yes, all dogs are different. Some show their feelings in a different way. Some don’t bond with everyone, while others bond easily. It just takes time, patience, and the willingness to go the extra mile.

I call Annabelle my Soul Mutt because we’re that close and sometimes, it seems like she just gets me, and I get her. We have the ideal dog-owner relationship, and for that, I’m lucky. But it didn’t happen overnight and it wasn’t always easy.

But I can speak from experience. It was absolutely worth it.

How do dogs help people in Stress Reduction?

by Lorna Ladd 0 Comments

Chances are, if you’re here reading this, you’re a dog lover. And if you’ve ever had a canine (or feline) companion in your life, you don’t need us to tell you that pets are great at relieving stress. Most dog lovers can’t imagine their life without their best friend, and they say that dogs simply bring more joy to their lives.

dog-lovers--dogs-stress-relieversImagine this: You just had a stressful day at work. Your boss yelled at you for a simple mistake. Your co-workers are talking about how layoffs are coming. Maybe you were so busy, you rushed through lunch, barely having time to taste your tuna sandwich. Or maybe you were so busy, you missed lunch altogether. The phone was ringing off the hook. Nothing seems to be going right.

I’m sure everyone reading this has experienced a day like this at least once in their life. Some live it daily. And overall, humans are more stressed now than ever before. Not only can stress give you a headache, too much stress can also kill you. High blood pressure is a dangerous problem, far too many people face. Sure, some if it comes from poor diets, but too much stress can also be a culprit.

How can dogs be a natural stress reliever copyAnd it’s no wonder that so many people are looking into natural stress relievers. Yoga. Exercise. Herbal remedies. All of these have been touted as natural stress relievers, and have been credited with having some degree of success. But you can also add one more item to that list. Dogs.

Go back to the scenario above. Now picture yourself coming home, defeated, stressed, and utterly worn down. When you get home, you probably just want to crash on the couch, flip on the TV, and forget about life for a moment. But then, once your key hits the lock on the front door, you hear the scampering of paws or the sound of a familiar bark. And as the door opens, your best friend is there waiting for you, their tail wagging nonstop, and their tongue out, ready to cover you with kisses. Your dog is there to tell you they love you no matter what, and they’re so happy to see you!

How can you not feel at least a little better after that?

There are many health benefits associated with owning a pet, not the least which is a reduction of stress. And while many of us probably knew that owning a dog or cat could lead to a happier life, based solely on our own lives and experiences, we now have science backing this up.

A 2001 study found that patients with high blood pressure were able to keep their blood pressure down during periods of high stress simply by owning a pet. In fact, you don’t even have to own a pet to experience the natural relaxation an animal can bring.

The reason for this is when you interact favorably with an animal, the stress-reducing hormone oxytocin is released, while your body decreases production of the cortisol – what is often called the stress hormone.

And there’s more good news for pet owners. Another study showed that people who owned pets were more likely to survive at least a year after having a heart attack.

Natural Stress Reduction- with dogs copyAs far as how to reap the benefits of having a pet, all you really have to do is play with one or pet one. Or spend some quality time with them, sharing some yummy treats  or laughing when they get DogsButter  stuck to the roof of their mouths! This is, of course, good news for all of those folks who can’t have a pet right now. Volunteer at a shelter or hang out at the dog park for an hour or two, and you’ll reap the same benefits and feel much better physically and mentally.