DOG for DOG is a movement to help as many dogs as possible. With every purchase DOG for DOG gives an equal amount of food to dogs in need.

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Stop Your Puppy From Chewing On Your Shoes (And Everything Else Too)

by Lorna Ladd 0 Comments
Stop Your Puppy From Chewing On Your Shoes (And Everything Else Too)

Puppies. They’re cute, adorable as heck, and as many people know, a lot of work. From the moment your new puppy comes home, they’re learning where they fit in. Considering that they’ve only been alive for a couple months, it’s understandable that they need to learn what they can – and can’t – do. There’s potty training, of course, but one of the biggest issues owners seem to face with a puppy is the dreaded chewing stage.

It’s a known fact that puppies chew up everything in sight. They’re not picky. They don’t care if it’s your $5 flip flops or your $100 pumps, they just like shoes. And cell phone chargers. And furniture. Well, pretty much anything they can get their mouths on. Not only is this an expensive problem because you’re losing a lot of stuff you’re probably attached to, it can also be an expensive trip to the vet’s office. Every time your dog chews something up, there’s a chance of a blockage or obstruction from whatever they’ve ingested. Their stomachs can handle a lot, sure, but shoelaces and socks can cause major problems, and in some cases, even death, for puppies.
puppiesSo needless to stay, it’s important to stop puppy chewing before it becomes a problem. But the question is, do you know how to stop your puppies from chewing things up?

Training a Puppy to Stop Chewing.

puppy chewing shoesBefore you can fix the problem, you need to understand the reasons behind it. Most of the time, puppies chew because they’re bored or teething. Separation anxiety may also come into play with both puppies and older dogs alike. Once you’ve determined the reason for their chewing, then you can take it from there.

If your dog is bored, give them something to do. This may mean more playtime or longer walks to wear them out. Or perhaps, another option might be to put your puppy in doggy daycare while you’re away at work. In addition to this, you may also want to purchase a puzzle toy that makes your dog work for their treats. You can find these toys at your local pet store. Brands such as Kong, Twist ‘n Treat, or a Buster Cube can be filled with delicious treats that keep them busy. It also keeps their mouths on the toy and not your new shoes or your laptop cable. It’s a win-win for both owner and dog. The dog has fun and enjoys a delicious treat, and the owner is less likely to come home to find their couch cushions torn to shreds.

You would just need to fill these toys with puppy or mini-dog treats such as these delicious mini peanut butter treats  Another interesting and useful tip is to take a Kong and fill it with DogsButter  before popping it in the freezer. The frozen DogsButter will take time for the dog to eat, keeping them busy for a long time, as well as providing them with a healthy and yummy treat.

puppy-training

Both of these options also work for teething puppies and those with separation anxiety as well. Teething puppies merely need something safe to chew on, and redirecting them away from the items they’re not supposed to eat, in favor of their toys, is the best way to break bad habits early on. Reward your puppy every time they chew on their toy by praising them and letting them know that’s what they’re supposed to be doing.

For separation anxiety, it can be a bit more challenging. If your dog suffers from severe separation anxiety, you may need to seek out a training professional to help them overcome their fears. However, if your pup is only mildy upset when you leave, you may be able to teach them that you leaving isn’t such a scary time – in fact, it can even be a fun time. By providing them with special toys (including the puzzle toys mentioned above filled with food) that they only get when you’re gone, you start giving them a reason to actually appreciate being only, rather than fear it.

While giving your dog bones and dental chews is a common practice, I urge you to be wary of all of those things. Many bones and dental chews specifically warn of dog’s ingesting the product and the possibility of an obstruction if they do. For this reason, if your dog or puppy is an intense chewer, it might be better to seek out a tough, high-quality toy that’s meant for the toughest of canine teeth. If you notice your dog is breaking off large pieces of the bone or chew and eating them, take it away immediately. And never give your dog bones not intended for chewing. Stay clear of any cooked bones as these can lodge themselves in their throat and gastrointestinal tract, sometimes leading to death.

But there is light at the end of the puppy tunnel! Most dogs outgrow the chewing phase, and puppies stop teething at around six months of age. Most likely, this is a temporary blip and a minor annoyance. While there are times you’ll wonder if the puppy stage will ever end, sadly, it will be over before you know it. And then, you’ll look back on that time and miss it.

So, stop focusing on the frustrating parts and take the time to bond with your new puppy while you have the chance. Because trust me, it’s over in a blink of an eye.

5 Unique Dog Bowls to Treat Your Pup

by Lorna Ladd 0 Comments

by Lo Lankford

Your pup might not truly care what their bowl looks like (as long as the thing has food, who cares!?) but you have to look at it everyday too, taking up space in your house and (possibly)wrecking havoc on your floors. The good news is that there is a seemingly endless amount of dog bowls available for purchase out there, both in local shops both large and small near you and online. It’s never been easier to find something that works well for both your pup and you! Display both of your personalities while finding a bowl that’s functional and appropriate for your space.
We started the hunt by tracking down five unique and fun bowls we hope you’ll like too. Now it’s just up to you to decide between them. Happy shopping!

1. For the speedy eater

Bloat stop dog bowlIf your dog charges his meals like its the last drop of water in the Sahara, it might be time to purchase a slow feeder. These inexpensive bowls help slow an animal’s intake by creating aunique eating experience that requires them to work a bit for their food. Highly rated on Amazon and Petsmart, the bowls have quickly gained in popularity recently as they’ve been a breakout fixer for bloat and regurgitation due to quick eating. We love this pink bowl from SloBowl, the top rated company for this type of bowl on Amazon. Looking for something more simple (and cheaper?) JW Pet makes one for $5! (Amazon, $17)

2. For the pups who need some height

If your dog is a tall one, reaching a bowl on the ground might be straining for his back and neck. Help him out with an elevated feeder, which allows him to amble over for dinner time and barely bend down to reach his food and water. Bonus points for you less sloppy mess on the floor to pick up after, though we do still recommend keeping a mat below the feeder. Get the height you need in a color you love and take a load off you just made life a little easier for your favorite furball. (Petsmart, $27-45).

3. For the designer dog

Henri Bendel Bone Dog bowlYour pup might not know who Henri Bendel is, but if you do (and you love the place!), why not get your dog bowl there too? This ceramic bowl is designed with the company’s signature brown and white stripes and features gold accenting for a fashionable finishing touch. Bone Appetit? Heh. Pretty good, Henri. (Henri Bendel, $58).

4. For the messy eater

neater feederDoes your dog eat his food like he’s making an art project with each bite he takes? Never fear there’s a bowl for that! Neater Feeders are a line of patented “mess proof pet feeders” that offer a mess proof and pleasant dog dining experience. With stellar reviews on Wag.com and Amazon, you have to think they’re working! Protect your floors and walls from water and food morsels and never look back from mopping the floor after each feeding. (Wag.com, $50).

5. For the handmade lovers

handmade loversIf you love buying handmade or simply want something monogrammed and/or totally unique,Etsy should be your first stop. A simple search for “dog bowl” yields over TK results, and you could easily spend an hour sifting through the pages of choices. Everything from elevated wooden feeders to ceramic bowls and everything in between. It was hard nearly impossible to pick just one, but if this is your thing we strongly suggest seeing what all the site has to offer and finding your own treasured handmade pick. Obsessed with what you find? Etsy is also a treasure trove of handmade leashes, collars, dog tags, food canisters, you name it! (Claylicious, $32)

BONUS: Looking for an automatic feeder? We recommend the Dog Mate D3000, available from Petsmart for $80.

 

Help Us Feed Pups in Need with Double the Donation

by DOG for DOG Team 0 Comments

Always wanted to try our all natural, made in the USA DOGSFOOD? Now’s the perfect time! When you purchase our Grain Free Ocean Fish & Salmon DOGSFOOD (great for active dogs!), we’ll DOUBLE the donation we make to dogs in need.

Double-Donation-PopUp

So for every bowl you pour for your own dog, we’ll be able to pour 2 for rescue dogs!

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Like Layla and Grandpa Gus at Old Friends Senior Dogs Sanctuary

Curious about switching your dog’s food? It’s pretty easy! Here’s how to make the switch…

switching_dog_food_tips

Ready to order DOGSFOOD for your pup, and for two dogs in need?

GRAIN FREE OCEAN FISH & SALMON – 14LBS

GRAIN FREE OCEAN FISH & SALMON – 4.5 LBS

 

FAQ- The Benefits of a Protein Meal

by Cate Burnette 0 Comments

Because we want to keep our dogs healthy and happy, we know that feeding them the best food available is high on our priority list as responsible pet parents. The ingredient list on the package is one of the first things we look at when picking a high-quality diet. But what is that stuff labeled “protein meal” or “meat meal,” and is it good for our dogs?

Why do dogs need protein Why do dogs need protein over other nutrients?

Dogs are designed by nature to eat protein from meat sources, not grains. A dog’s four sharp and pointed “cuspids,” what we call the canine teeth, are intended to grasp and hold food. When looking for the best diet for your pet, meat and a named meat meal, like beef, chicken meal or lamb meal, should be listed before any grains.Many veterinary nutritionists believe the high grain content of some manufactured pet foods is a primary contributor to the growing obesity and allergy problems in pets, so if grains are listed above an animal protein, you’re looking at a lower quality of food. 

What is protein meal?

Protein meal is a dried end product of the dog food cooking process known as rendering. Rendering is a lot like making stew – except that this stew is intentionally overcooked.With rendering, you start with a meat stew, cook away the water and bake the residue. In its simplest, purest form, protein meal is meat with the water and fat removed. The dried meat is then ground into small granules or powder for use in pet food. And you end up with a highly concentrated protein powder– or protein meal. 

How nutritious is protein meal?

A high-quality grade protein meal can actually be a more abundant source of protein than the whole meat from which it was made. For example, whole chicken contains about 70 percent water and 18 percent protein. Yet after rendering, the resulting chicken protein meal contains just 10 percent water and a whopping 65 percent protein.That’s nearly four times more protein than the whole chicken.Fish meal contains 92 percent protein and pure beef meal is around 78 percent. 

What are the health benefits of protein meal?

Pure protein meal, as opposed to a combined meat and bone meal or meat by-product meal, is a good source of the concentrated protein that is considered nutritionally excellent for your dog. Proteins are necessary for all aspects of growth and development and are very important in structural makeup and the immune system. In addition, they are burned as calories and can be stored and converted to fat.

Are there grades of protein meal?

Pure meat meal cannot contain blood, hair, hoof, horn, hide trimmings, manure, or stomach or rumen contents, except for amounts that may be unavoidably included during processing. It cannot contain any added extraneous substances, and may not contain any more than 14 percent of materials that are not easily digested. Also, no more than 11 percent of the crude protein in the meal can be ingredients the dog cannot digest at all, for example feathers, beaks, or hooves. 

How do we recognize low-grade materials?

Avoid dog foods containing any meat meal that includes the words “ by-products” in its name and/or fails to identify the specific source animal. Some examples of inferior meat-based protein ingredients include meat meal, animal meal, chicken by-product meal, meat and bone meal, glandular meal, poultry meal, and blood meal.Notice the generic nature of those phrases.When you see components like these in any ingredients list, it’s a sign you’re probably looking at a lower quality dog food.

 

Are Giant Breed Dogs a Giant Responsibility?

by Lorna Ladd 3 Comments

There are big dogs, and then there are the giants. And let’s face it, giant breeds aren’t for everyone. Just because you might be a dog lover doesn’t mean you want a Godzilla-sized dog romping through your house, clearing off tables, counter tops, and leaving a trail of slobber everywhere they go.

But for those of us who love the giant breeds, we can’t think of anything better than curling up in bed with a dog who takes up most of it. While there are no official height or weight requirements that differentiate a giant dog from – well – just another large dog, there are certain breeds that are known for being larger than life (truly). These are the dogs that get attention wherever they go due to their size (and often the size of their heart as well). Great Danes, St. Bernards, Irish Wolfhounds, Newfoundlands, and Mastiffs are just a few of the more well-known breeds that are often classified as “giants”.

Huge dogs - English Mastiff Learn the basics in taking home a Giant Breed dog

In order to reach their massive size, giant breeds usually take longer to mature, growing more slowly than their smaller canine cohorts. Also, because many of the giant breeds often have health-disadvantages smaller dogs don’t, it’s important to pay extra special attention to their health and nutrition. Problems like hip dysplasia, digestive issues, and bloat are common problems for these breeds. Because of this, many may even require a specific diet that focuses on weight and joint management in addition to every day nutrition.

Great Dane puppyBut first, let’s start from the beginning. Let’s say you just brought home your Great Dane puppy. He’s 8 weeks old and is currently, a manageable size. Of course, he won’t stay that way for long, but believe it or not, he won’t be fully grown until he’s about two years old. As he grows, it’s important to find a diet that’s suitable for his growing body, to make sure his joints and bones can handle his body weight when he reaches his adult size. Also, you want to make sure that your puppy doesn’t grow too fast because it puts more pressure on his bones and joints, which is something you definitely don’t want since it can lead to serious problems later on and even shorten your dog’s life span.

With any dog, no matter the breed or age, choosing a high-quality kibble is incredibly important. But with a growing puppy, you need to go the extra mile when looking at food labels. And don’t think you can just pick up any random puppy food and call it a day. Mainly because while puppy food may work for most dogs, you need to look at the label. Oftentimes, even puppy food made specifically for large breeds contain too much protein, fat and calories, which can accelerate growth – which as we mentioned earlier, is something we don’t want to do.

There are large breed puppy formulas out there that are fine, you just need to read the labels. Finding a large breed puppy food that says it’s “Approved for all life stages” is one way you can cut down on issues, since these foods are intended not only for puppies, but also adult dogs as well.

So what should you look for in a puppy food? Many of the same things you’re going to look for in an adult dog food as well.

St. Bernard - adults and puppies

For both adults and puppies, you’ll want to start with the list of ingredients. The first item listed should be some sort of protein source. And while you may be scared away by pork or chicken meal, don’t be. Meat meal is often a better source of protein than just chicken or pork itself. Typically, looking at the first five ingredients gives you an idea about the quality of the food. The more meat ingredients listed within those first five, the better.

From there, you should look at the protein levels. Unless you’re feeding a raw or grain-free diet, protein levels should not be higher than 24%. Fat levels need to be between 12-14% at most. You can find this information on the label, and for an example of a dog good that fits these requirements, check out DogForDog Pork and Brown Rice.

If you are feeding raw or grain-free, a higher protein content isn’t likely a concern as the food is less likely to contribute to weight gain (think of it like a high-protein diet in humans versus one high in carbohydrates). While many pet owners fear protein, it’s not so much the protein that causes the issues – it’s the weight gain. If you feed your beloved pooch a high-quality, grain-free kibble such as DogForDog Ocean Fish and Salmon Meals, you should be golden.

 

Ten Toxic Foods You Shouldn’t Give Your Pet

by Lorna Ladd 2 Comments

by Amber Kingsley

Pet Toxic Foods

Toxic Pet Foods

We all love our pets and want to make them happy. However, sometimes the best intentions can have unfortunate results. The good news is that, when it comes to foods for your pets, a little bit of knowledge can guarantee your good intentions are rewarded. Before slipping your dog or cat that extra morsel under the table, it’s important to know which human foods your beloved pet can digest, and which ones could result in a hasty trip to the vet.

1. Chocolate

Most people have heard the “don’t feed your dog chocolate” mantra before. But you’d be surprised by how many pet owners give their dogs the occasional bite chocolate anyway, thinking it to be as much of a reward for their canine friend as it is for them. You’ve probably heard it before: “Well my dog had chocolate, and he was fine afterwards. It’s just a myth.” Unfortunately, that’s not the case. Even if your dog has had chocolate once and digested it without severe side effects, you’re still putting his/her health at risk.

Why? Chocolate contains theobromine, an alkaloid that dogs can’t metabolize in the same way that humans can. When a dog eats too much chocolate too fast, it can cause damage to the nervous system, kidneys, lungs and heart. In puppies, toy dogs and senior dogs, the risk is the greatest, and death from theobromine poisoning is a real possibility. To keep your dog as safe as possible, keep him or her clear of your chocolate stash. If your dog has a sweet tooth that just won’t be denied, try making him or her a doggie-safe sweet treat.

2. Caffeine

Caffeine is dangerous to most pets, so keep your dogs, cats and small animals caffeine-free. Like chocolate, caffeine is more difficult for animals to process, and its side effects can be deadly. While most of us would never give our pets caffeine intentionally, we don’t think twice about throwing used tea bags and coffee filters in the trash. Since many dogs love nothing more than to raid the trash can when no one is home, catastrophic levels of caffeine consumption can often happen unintentionally. Protect your pets by disposing of caffeinated products safely, and never leave an unfinished cup of coffee, energy drink or caffeinated diet pill on an easy-to-reach surface.

3. Milk and Eggs

Contrary to popular myth, milk and eggs are both dangerous for your cat. Why? Cats are actually lactose intolerant, meaning that their digestive system can’t break down the sugars contained in milk properly. Although a small amount of milk probably won’t kill your cat, it can cause digestive issues, dehydration and diarrhea. In kittens, excessive milk consumption can prove deadly. Similarly, raw eggs are a big red flag. As well as posing a salmonella risk, raw eggs contain avidin, which inhibits the absorption of vitamin B in cats. Over time, this can cause skin problems and fur loss.

4. Macadamia nuts

Macadamia nuts are snacks that you wouldn’t want your dog to get their paws on. This type of nut is 100% off-limits for dogs. Most dogs experience different kinds of symptoms if they consume a decent amount of these. Macadamia nuts aren’t often deadly to dogs, but they can cause hypothermia, joint pain, tremors and weakness.

5. Onions, Garlic, Chives and Leeks

Although most pets aren’t inclined to feast on them, onions, garlic, chives and leek are all of the Allium family, and are toxic to both dogs and cats. In any form, these foods can cause red blood cells to rupture, resulting in anemia, lethargy and weight loss. Certain Japanese dog breeds, including Akitas and Shiba Inus, are more susceptible to this kind of poisoning, so take special care to keep them away from any foods that may have been seasoned with garlic or onion-based products.

6. Avocado

Some breeds of dogs have negative reactions to eating avocados. It’s not really recommended for pets and is sometimes considered unsafe for them. Avocado contains Persin that may cause illness to different types of pets. For canines and felines, we don’t expect to see serious signs of illness. However, rabbits, birds, rodents, and some other large animals are very sensitive to the substance that can be found in it.

7. Grapes, Raisins

Grapes, raisins and macadamia nuts are the kind of little tidbits that most pet owners don’t think twice about feeding to their dogs. Unfortunately, they are all toxic to canines. Just 4-5 grapes can make a dog sick, causing side effects such as vomiting, loss of appetite, abdominal pain and dehydration, and possibly even resulting in kidney failure and death.

8. Raw Eggs

We should be careful when giving our pets food that’s meant for human consumption. For humans, eating eggs can provide you vitamins and minerals. But we can’t say the same for our pets. Raw eggs contain a substance called avidin. It lessens the consumption of vitamin B. It can also cause skin and fur coat problems.

9. Alcohol

Alcohol is dangerous for almost all types of pets. When a dog or cat gets exposed to alcohol, the effects that it causes to the pet’s nervous system is similar to that of a human’s. They become drowsy and lose coordination. If they get exposed to a higher level of alcohol, their breathing and heart rate slow down.

10. Bones and Fat

Dangerous to dogs, cats and small animals alike, never give your pet scraps with the bones still attached. Dogs in particular will not think twice about chewing on a turkey carcass, but the fallout can be fatal. Small, brittle bones and bone shards can splinter, choking your pet, or even causing abdominal perforation. Raw meat and bones can also be a breeding ground for bacteria, carrying dangerous salmonella and e-coli bacterium. Similarly dangerous, fat trimmings can cause pancreatitis.

If you suspect that your pet might have ingested a toxic food, then call your veterinarian or the Pet Poison helpline immediately. If you don’t have an emergency vet in your area, then the Pet Poison helpline can aid you to identify the level of toxicity that your pet is experiencing, and walk you through the appropriate response procedure.

To keep your dog healthy feed  a grain-free diet, like DOGSFOOD Ocean fish and Salmon  which is the pefect diet to keep your dog’s weight in check and to help eliminate food allergy-related itching.

Ask the Vet: Is Grain Free Food Helpful for an Overweight Bulldog?

by Lorna Ladd 0 Comments

fat bulldog w dog for dog logo

Question:

I have an 8 year old extremely over weight bulldog. She also suffers from acid reflex. I am looking into changing her food. Would it be helpful for her digestion to try grain free and gluten free food?

Answer:

Undoubtedly, a grain-free, gluten-free dog food would help her digestion.

Acid reflux in dogs is usually congenital, caused by a condition known as hiatal hernia. A hiatal hernia is a protrusion of abdominal contents into the chest cavity through the esophageal hiatus, a natural opening through the diaphragm. Younger pets are at greater risk of developing this condition because their esophageal sphincters are still developing. Your older dog may have an undiagnosed hiatal hernia and that should be checked out by your vet.

Many holistic veterinarians recommend starting dogs with acid reflux on a low-residue, balanced, home-prepared diet consisting of cooked bland veggies and meats to avoid any underlying food sensitivities. Eliminating allergenic ingredients like gluten, rice, soy, and all genetically modified (GM) foods also seems to help. Additionally, getting rid of all preservatives, colorings, additives, and emulsifiers used in commercial dog foods is recommended.

I would suggest looking at the grain free food here: http://www.dogfordog.com/grain-free-with-ocean-fish-salmon-14-lbs/

The link I gave you shows you all the natural ingredients and tells you how to transition your dog safely from her old dog food to the new food.

I hope this helps.

Cate RVT

Healthy Treats For Small Dogs

by Lorna Ladd 0 Comments
Healthy Treats For Small Dogs

If you’re the pet parent of a miniature or toy dog, you know that finding doggy treats for small dogs that are easily chewable, yet still nutritious, can be problematic. Most dog treats are too large and too hard for tiny teeth and are manufactured with chemicals and fillers that have no nutritional value. However, a solution can be found right in your own refrigerator or pantry.

Treats for small dogs  already in your frige

Baby carrots fit perfectly into smaller dog mouths and, with their crunchy texture, help keep your dog’s teeth clean while adding the fiber to her diet that benefits a strong digestive tract. Believe it or not, my maltese can’t eat enough carrots. So carrots have been a great snack for our entire family! Additionally, the beta-carotene that gives the carrot its bright orange color is an anti-oxidant that builds the immune system and converts to Vitamin A during digestion. Vitamin A works to supple the skin, improve hair growth, and maintain your dog’s healthy eyesight.

Small bites of peeled apple or pear are a rich source of Vitamin C (necessary for a healthy immune system), all of the B-Complex Vitamins (key elements in maintaining red blood cells), and minerals such as calcium, phosphorus, and potassium. Studies have shown that apples and/or pears help dogs with heart disease by reducing high blood pressure and lowering bad cholesterol.

Broccoli contains high levels of both soluble and insoluble fiber and is a rich source of Vitamin C that is necessary for the over-all health of your dog. Broccoli is also rich in vitamin A, iron, vitamin K, B-complex vitamins, zinc, phosphorus and phytonutrients. Phytonutrients are compounds that lower the risk of diabetes, heart disease, and certain cancers.

Rich in antioxidants and vitamins, blueberries are known to alleviate and protect against various forms of intestinal inflammation in dogs, including diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, and colitis. Blueberries are rich in polyphenols, which have an antimicrobial and antioxidative effect and are necessary to help increase your dog’s immune system.

Green peas are low in fat and calories, and high in Vitamin C, Vitamin E, and Omega-3 fatty acids that make them a perfect treat for the little dog that doesn’t need to gain weight. The generous amounts of Vitamin B1 and folate, B2, B3, and B6 reduce your dog’s risk factor for heart disease by lowering an amino acid in the blood that can cause blood clots, strokes and heart attacks.

The perfect treat for small dogs

If you’re pressed for time and the chopping of fruits and veggies seems endless,   try an all-natural peanut butter mini-treat that is made with all the nutritious ingredients listed above. Dogs love the taste of peanut butter and these mini-treats are made to fit in a smaller dog’s mouth. Additionally, they have a soft, moist consistency suited for older dogs, are low in fat and calories, and are wheat, corn, and soy-free. This smaller size is also perfect to use as training treats when working with a new dog or puppy.  Check out DOGSTREAT mini, you’re small dog will love them!